What is Dietary Fiber (or Fibre)? What Does it Do & Why Do we Need it? List of Foods Highest in Fiber

What is Dietary Fiber (or Fibre) - What does it do & why do we need it - List of Foods Highest in Fiber

We are always told by nutrition experts to include more fiber in our diet. But what is fiber? And what does it do? Here we will discuss why we need fiber, as well as the foods highest in fiber

 

What is Dietary Fiber?

Fiber is the indigestible carbohydrate structural parts of a plant eg. skin, pulp, seeds, stems, leaves or root. Fiber is not absorbable or digestible by humans

Definition of Fiber

Fiber is a carbohydrate – but it does not contribute to calories

Fiber is not considered a nutrient because it does not provide any calories (or essential nutrients on it’s own). However, this does not meant to say that fiber-containing foods do not contain any nutrients. In fact, foods high in fiber are often associated with being nutrient dense, with the added benefit of promoting the feeling of fullness (due to the fiber)

 

Functions of Dietary Fiber

1. Fiber make nutrients more bio available to the body and assists in the delivery of nutrients

2. Fiber releases ‘organic acids’ which:

  • provides fuel for the body
  • cleans the digestive tract
  • helps the liver to function properly
  • helps to remove toxins, cholesterol and sugars from the body

3. When we ingest dietary fiber, it passes through our digestive system unchanged (without breaking down), increases food volume, and undergoes either ‘partial’ or ‘complete fermentation’ in the large intestine (colon)

 

What is Fermentation?

Fermentation is the process that converts sugar to acids, gases and/or alcohol ethanol. Here, we are talking about the bacteria in our colon that feed on undigested carbohydrates (fiber), releasing short chain fatty acids

 

Short Chain Fatty Acids (SCFA’s)

Non-absorbed carbohydrates like pectin, gum arabic, oligosaccharides and resistant starch are fermented to the ‘short chain fatty acids’ – butyrate, acetate & propionate

These SCFA’s have many beneficial health effects, such as:

  • stabilize blood glucose
  • reduce LDL cholesterol
  • lower colonic pH which protects from formation of colonic polyps
  • increase absorption of minerals (such as calcium, magnesium & iron)
  • involved in intestinal immune system functions
  • reduces inflammation & improves mucosal lining

 

Fiber can cause flatulence (gas)

High fiber diets can cause flatulence, specifically due to the fermentation of oligosaccharides (from beans). But this tends to minimize as your body adjusts to these foods

 

There are Two Types of Fiber

– based on it’s solubility in water. We need to get both types in our daily diets, as they are equally important for maintaining good health, digestion & preventing disease. Most plant foods contain both soluble and insoluble fiber

Soluble Fiber dissolves in water and forms a gel-like substance. This helps to remove waste products, including cholesterol and slows down digestion

Insoluble Fiber does not dissolve in water and acts like a scrubber – it’s stiff, rough texture scrubs the digestive tract which traps & removes any unwanted debris or ‘garbage’, helping to move material through the digestive system

 

1. Soluble Fiber

Soluble fibre dissolves in water & forms a gel

Soluble fiber turns into a gel-like substance which entraps food, toxins, bacteria, sugars, cholesterol and fats in the stomach, and carries them through the digestive tract. Soluble fiber can increase faecal weight by 40-100% and helps to slow down digestion. Fiber from grains hold more water than do fruits & vegetables

Did you Know - Oat bran contains the soluble fiber beta-glucan, which helps to lower cholesterol

Soluble fibre lowers bad (LDL) & total cholesterol levels

Soluble fiber binds to bile acids (which are made from cholesterol) and excretes them out of the body. Oat bran (a good source of soluble fiber) seems to be most protective against heart disease due to this effect

 

Soluble fiber feeds good bacteria in our gut

Soluble fiber is fermented by colonic bacteria, and produces SCFA’s, which has many health benefits. You may know these as ‘Prebiotics’ (feeds the good bacteria in our gut)

 

Soluble fiber is found mainly in plant cells, and include:

  • Pectin
  • Gums
  • Mucilage
  • Beta-glucan (eg. in barley & oats)
  • Inulin

 

Good sources of soluble fiber are:

  • Oats, including rolled oats and porridge
  • Barley
  • Nuts
  • Seed husks, including flaxseeds & Psyllium Husk
  • Legumes, including chickpeas, kidney beans, other dried beans, lentils & split peas
  • Fruit, including apples, apricots, avocados, pears, plums & strawberries
  • Vegetables, including brussels sprouts, broccoli, peas, carrots & asparagus
  • Soy milk & Soy products

 

2. Insoluble Fiber

Insoluble fiber (and psyllium) passes through the digestive system largely intact, and promotes regularity. A major role of insoluble fiber is preventing constipation & related health issues such as hemorroids

 

Insoluble fiber does not dissolve in water & adds bulk/rougage to faeces

Insoluble fiber adds bulk to feces & forms softer stools, having a laxative type effect. This helps to move contents through the intestines & speeds gut transit time.

 

Insoluble fiber helps to promote the feeling of fullness

Insoluble fiber fills up the stomach quickly so you are less likely to overeat and can therefore, help with weight management

 

Insoluble fiber makes up the structural parts of cell walls, and include:

  • Mostly cellulose
  • Hemi-cellulose
  • Lignans (eg. seeds in berries)
  • Xanthan
  • Resistant Starch

 

Good sources of insoluble fiber are:

  • Fruit (especially in the skin of fruit)
  • Vegetables, including green peas, carrots, kale, broccoli & cauliflower (and found in the skin of root vegetables)
  • Nuts & Seeds (especially flaxseeds)
  • Wheat & Corn bran (including popcorn)
  • Wholegrains (like barley & brown rice)

 

Soluble vs. Insoluble Fiber

Both types of fiber (soluble & insoluble) are beneficial for the body. Soluble fiber slows digestion by forming a gel-like substance, while the Insoluble fiber adds bulk to speed up transit time. Therefore, both types of fiber contribute to maintaining a healthy digestive system

Some foods (mostly plant foods) contain both soluble and insoluble fiber. For example, soluble fibre can be found in the inside of an apple and insoluble fibre can be found in the skin of an apple

What is Dietary Fiber (or Fibre) What Does it Do & why do we need it - List of Foods Highest in Fiber Article - Types of Fiber

Why we Aren’t Getting Enough Fiber

Did you know: The average person is only getting 50% of their daily requirement for fiber

Two thirds of the “Western Diet” come from highly processed and refined foods – mainly from corn, wheat, rice and soy, which are all stripped of their dietary fiber & nutrients

These ‘refined foods’ have replaced whole, natural foods which would normally keep us full and provide a whole range of nutrients, including fiber

 

When we Don’t Get Enough Fiber

Insufficient fiber produces feces that are dry and hard, difficult to pass and can lead to constipation, hemorrhoids and anal fissures in the short term, but can lead to more serious complications & diseases in the long term

Eating a low fiber diet can contribute to health disorders such as:

  • Constipation
  • Haemorrhoids
  • Diverticulosis – small hernias caused by prolonged constipation
  • Irritable Bowel Syndrome – pain, flatulence and bloating
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Obesity
  • Coronary Heart Disease
  • Diabetes – too much glucose (sugar) in the blood
  • Colon Cancer

Eating fermentable fiber sources from fresh fruit, vegetables, whole grains, nuts & seeds reduce the risk of most diseases

 

Health Benefits of Eating a High Fiber Diet

Adequate fiber in the diet offer many health benefits. It helps normalize blood cholesterol levels, blood glucose levels, maintain healthy bowel functions & help you maintain a healthy weight and lifestyle

What is Dietary Fiber (or Fibre)-What Does it Do & why do we need it - List of Foods Highest in Fiber

Eating a diet high in dietary fiber has been associated with reduced risk of:

  • Heart Disease
  • Stroke
  • Obesity
  • Hypertension
  • Diabetes
  • Gastrointestinal Disorders

Increased consumption of fiber:

  • Balances blood sugar levels & prevent spikes in blood sugar
  • Keeps digestion regular
  • Increase satiety (promotes feeling of fullness)
  • Aids in weight loss
  • Improves immune function
  • Reduces inflammation
  • Reduces blood pressure
  • Reduces cholesterol
  • Improves serum lipid concentrations

What is Dietary Fiber (or Fibre) What Does it Do & why do we need it List of Foods Highest in Fiber Article - Health Benefits

 

Fiber is Good for Digestive Health

Insoluble fiber, in particular, prevents constipation by providing bulk to stools which can pass through the system quickly. Adequate amounts of water is necessary for it to pass smoothly

Soluble fiber feeds ‘good bacteria’ in our gut which also helps to regulate digestion

 

Fiber Lowers Risk for Disease

Soluble fiber helps remove cholesterol from the body and has been shown to be the most protective against heart disease. Oats are an exceptional source of soluble fiber

In countries with traditionally high fiber diets, diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and bowel cancer are much less common. This may due to high fiber foods typically being less processed & the accompanying nutrients (eg. phytochemicals) found in these foods that protect your health. Fiber rich foods are also often lower in GI & healthier in general. It is the sum of interacting effects that makes fiber a wonderfully powerful element in the diet, contributing to many health benefits

 

Fiber may lower risk for Colorectal cancer

Fiber may decrease risk of colon cancer & gastrointestinal diseases (binds carcinogenic substances and speed their transit from the gut), but better quality studies need to be carried out to prove this link. Short chain fatty acids seem to have protective effects

However, studies have found a stronger link between meat consumption (particularly red meat) and increased risk for colon cancer, while eating plenty of vegetables lowers risk. A large study in 2011, found that a fiber containing diet (particularly from whole grains) was associated with a lower cancer related death, especially among males

 

Fiber & Weight Control

People who are overweight or obese can lose significant amounts of weight by increasing the amount of soluble fiber in their diet. Since we are not able to digest the fiber, it adds bulk to the stomach without adding calories

Foods high in fiber:

  • are bulky and fill you up
  • extends feeling of fullness for longer
  • are often low in fat
  • delays absorption of sugars which helps to control blood sugar levels
  • requires extra chewing
  • help you eat less and consume fewer calories
  • reduces food cravings
  • helps the body detox naturally

 

Fiber lowers Risk for Type 2 Diabetes

Insoluble fiber has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity & decrease inflammation, both risk factors for developing Type 2 Diabetes

 

Fiber improves Control of Blood Sugar Levels for Diabetics

Soluble fiber delays the absorption of sugars and lowers the blood glucose response after a meal, particularly helpful for people with diabetes. High fiber foods also tend to have a lower GI, making you feel fuller for longer

 

Watch this video for a Summary of Fiber & some high fiber foods (listed below)

Recommended Intake & Food Sources

Most people do not get enough fiber in their diet. We should be consuming 25-35 grams of fibre everyday, but most people do not reach this recommendation

It is recommended that women get at least 25 g/d (based on a 2000 calorie diet) and men get 38g/d. The DV (Daily Value) for all adults is 25 g/d

Aim for 6-8 grams per meal and 3-4 grams per snack

You can work out requirements for children by taking their age & adding 5 grams to work out fiber per day. The rate of the digestive system slows with age, so older people have increased requirements for fiber

 

Food Sources of Fiber:

Whole plant foods are the best source of dietary fiber

Fiber is naturally found in:

  • Fruit (fresh or dried)
  • Vegetables
  • Whole grains
  • Legumes
  • Nuts & Seeds

 

What is Dietary Fiber (or Fibre) What Does it Do & why do we need it List of Foods Highest in Fiber Article - Dietary Fiber

Full List of Foods Highest in Fiber

Eating plenty of fruit & vegetables and a variety from other sources mentioned below will get you enough fiber in your day

Source: Nutrient Values Retrieved from the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, 2012

Fruit

1 medium Asian Pear = 9.9g (39.6% DV)

1 cup Raspberries = 8g (32% DV)

1 cup Blackberries = 7.6g (30.4% DV)

2 Guavas = 6g (24% DV)

1 medium Pear = 5.5g (22% DV)

1/2 medium Avocado = 4.6g (18.4%)

1 medium Apple (with skin) = 4.4g (17.6% DV)

15 Grapes = 3.5g (14% DV)

1 small Orange = 3.1g (12.4% DV)

1 medium Banana = 3.1g (12.4% DV)

8 large Strawberries = 2.9g (11.6% DV)

1 cup Strawberries = 2.9g (11.6%)

4 fresh Apricots = 2.8g (11.2% DV)

3/4 cup Blueberries = 2.7g (10.8% DV)

1 cup Mango, pieces = 2.6g (10.4% DV)

1 medium Peach = 2.2g (8.8% DV)

1 Kiwifruit, Green = 2.1g (8.4% DV)

12 Cherries = 2.1g (8.4% DV)

3 Prunes, dried = 2g (8% DV)

2 small Plums = 1.8g (7.2% DV)

7 halves dried Apricots = 1.8g (7.2% DV)

1 Kiwifruit, Gold = 1.7g (6.8% DV)

2 medium dried Figs = 1.6g (6.4% DV)

1/2 cup Melon (honey dew), diced = 1.4g (5.6% DV)

1/2 cup Papaya, pieces = 1.2g (4.8% DV)

2 tbsp Raisins = 1g (4% DV)

1/2 cup Melon (cantaloupe), cubed = 0.7g (2.8% DV)

1 cup Watermelon, diced = 0.6g (2.4% DV)

 

Vegetables

Cooked Vegetables

1/2 cup Artichoke, hearts = 7.2g (28.8% DV)

1/2 cup Green Peas, frozen = 4.4g (17.6% DV)

1/2 cup Frozen Vegetables = 4g (16% DV)

1/2 cup Spinach, frozen = 3.5g (14% DV)

1/2 cup Sweet Potato, with skin = 3.3g (13.2% DV)

1/2 cup Acorn Squash, mashed = 3.2g (12.8% DV)

1/2 cup Broccoli = 2.6g (10.4% DV)

1/2 Turnip Greens, chopped = 2.5g (10% DV)

1/2 cup Carrots, sliced = 2.3g (9.2% DV)

1/2 cup Tomatoes in juice, canned = 2.3g (9.2% DV)

1/2 cup Brussels Sprouts = 2g (8% DV)

1/2 cup whole kernel Corn, frozen = 2g (8% DV)

1/2 cup Green Beans = 2g (8% DV)

1/2 cup Okra, frozen = 1.9g (7.6% DV)

1/2 cup Sauerkraut = 1.8g (7.2% DV)

1/2 cup Asparagus = 1.8g (7.2% DV)

1/2 cup Tomato Sauce, canned = 1.8g (7.2% DV)

1/2 cup Beets, slices = 1.7g (6.8% DV)

1/2 cup Turnip, diced = 1.6g (6.4% DV)

1/2 cup Potato, with skin = 1.4g (5.6% DV)

1/2 cup Cauliflower, pieces = 1.4g (5.6% DV)

1/2 cup Kale = 1.3g (5.2% DV)

1/2 cup Zucchini, sliced = 0.9g (3.6% DV)

 

Raw Vegetables

1 cup Red Cabbage, sliced = 1.9g (7.6% DV)

1 medium Carrot = 1.7g (6.8% DV)

1 medium Tomato = 1.5g (6% DV)

1/2 cup fresh Onion, chopped = 1.4g (5.6% DV)

1/2 cup Green Pepper, chopped = 1.3g (5.2% DV)

1 cup Cos or Romaine Lettuce, shredded = 1g (4% DV)

1 cup Iceberg Lettuce, shredded = 0.9g (3.6% DV)

1/2  cup Celery, chopped = 0.8g (3.2% DV)

1/2 cup Mushroom, pieces = 0.4g (1.6% DV)

1/2 cup Cucumber, sliced = 0.3g (1.2% DV)

 

Whole grains

Cereal Grains

1/2 cup Barley, hulled = 15.9g (63.6% DV)

(1/2 cup Barley, pearled = 3g)

1/2 cup Wheat bran = 12.4g (49.6% DV)

1/2 cup Oats = 8.3g (33.2% DV)

1/2 cup Sorghum = 6.4g (25.6% DV)

3/4 cup Bran Flakes = 5.3g (21.2% DV)

1/2 cup Amaranth, cooked = 5.2g (20.8% DV)

1/2 cup Bulgar, cooked = 4.1g (16.4% DV)

1/4 cup Wheat germ = 3.8g (15.2% DV)

1/2 cup Spelt, cooked = 3.8g (15.2% DV)

3 cups Popcorn, popped = 3.6g (14.4% DV)

1/2 cup Teff, cooked = 3.5g (14% DV)

1/2 cup Barley, pearled = 3g (12% DV)

1/2 cup Oat bran, cooked = 2.8g (11.2% DV)

1/2 cup Quinoa, cooked = 2.6g (10.4% DV)

1/2 cup Buckwheat Groats, cooked = 2.3g (9.2% DV)

1/2 cup Brown Rice (long grain), cooked = 1.8g (7.2% DV)

1/2 cup Wild Rice, cooked = 1.5g (6% DV)

1/2 cup Couscous, cooked = 1.1g (4.4% DV)

1/2 cup Millet, cooked = 1.1g (4.4% DV)

 

Whole Grain Products

1/3 cup Bran-Based cereal = 5-12g

1/2 cup whole wheat flour = 6.4g (25.6% DV)

1 cup whole wheat Spaghetti, cooked = 6.3g (25.2% DV)

1 medium Oat bran muffin = 5.2g (20.8% DV)

1/2 cup Oatmeal, cooked = 4.1g (16.4% DV)

2 Weetabix biscuits, whole wheat = 4g (16% DV)

 

Breads

1 small whole wheat Pita = 2.1g (8.4% DV)

1 slice Pumpernickel bread = 2.1g (8.4% DV)

1 slice whole wheat bread = 1.9g (7.6% DV)

1 slice Rye bread = 1.9g (7.6% DV)

 

Legumes (cooked)

1/2 cup Navy beans = 9.6g (38.4% DV)

1/2 cup Adzuki beans = 8.4g (33.6% DV)

1/2 cup Split peas = 8.1g (32.4% DV)

1/2 cup Lentils = 7.8g (31.2% DV)

1/2 cup Pinto beans = 7.7g (30.8% DV)

1/2 cup Mung beans = 7.7g (30.8% DV)

1/2 cup baked beans, canned = 7g (28% DV)

1/2 cup Black beans = 7.5g (30% DV)

1/2 cup Chickpeas = 6.2g (24.8% DV)

1/2 cup Lima beans = 6.6g (26.4% DV)

1/2 cup Red Kidney beans = 5.7g (22.8% DV)

1/2 cup White beans = 5.6g (22.4% DV)

1/2 cup Soybeans = 5.2g (20.8% DV)

1/2 cup Black-eyed peas = 4.7g (18.8% DV)

1/2 cup Broad beans (Fava beans) = 4.6g (18.4% DV)

 

Nuts & Seeds

1 level tbsp Chia seeds (15g) = 5.2g (20.8% DV)

1 piece Coconut (45g) = 4g (16% DV)

1 level tbsp Flaxseeds (10.3g) = 3.3g (13.2% DV)

1/4 cup mixed nuts, dry roasted (34g) = 3.1g (12.4% DV)

21 Pistachio nuts, raw (15g) = 1.5g (6% DV)

10 Pecan nuts (15g) = 1.4g (5.6% DV)

1 heaped tbsp Sunflower seeds (15g) = 1.3g (5.2% DV)

5-6 Macadamia nuts (15g) = 1.3g (5.2% DV)

1 level tbsp Sesame seeds (9g) = 1.1g (4.4% DV)

5 whole Walnuts (15g) = 1g (4% DV)

167 Pine nuts (28g) = 1g (4% DV)

6 Almonds (7.2g) = 0.9g (3.6% DV)

1 heaped tbsp Pumpkin seeds (15g) = 0.9g (3.6% DV)

5 Hazel nuts (7g) = 0.7g (2.8% DV)

12 Cashews (15g) = 0.5g (2% DV)

1 Brazil Nut (5g) = 0.4g (1.6% DV)

 

What is Dietary Fiber (or Fibre) What Does it Do & why do we need it - List of Foods Highest in Fiber Article - High Fiber Foods

 

A Summary of the Foods Highest in Fiber

Most of these foods provide more than 20% of your daily value for dietary fiber

Fruit

1 medium Asian Pear = 9.9g (39.6% DV)

1 cup Raspberries = 8g (32% DV)

1 cup Blackberries = 7.6g (30.4% DV)

2 Guavas = 6g (24% DV)

1 medium Pear = 5.5g (22% DV)

1/2 medium Avocado = 4.6g (18.4%)

1 medium Apple (with skin) = 4.4g (17.6% DV)

 

All other fruit: 0.6-3.5g (2.4 – 14% DV)

 

Vegetables

1/2 cup Artichoke, hearts = 7.2g (28.8% DV)

1/2 cup Green Peas, frozen = 4.4g (17.6% DV)

1/2 cup Frozen Vegetables = 4g (16% DV)

1/2 cup Spinach, frozen = 3.5g (14% DV)

1/2 cup Sweet Potato, with skin = 3.3g (13.2% DV)

1/2 cup Acorn Squash, mashed = 3.2g (12.8% DV)

1/2 cup Broccoli = 2.6g (10.4% DV)

 

All other vegetables: 0.3-2.5g (1.2-10% DV)

 

Wholegrains

1/2 cup Barley, hulled = 15.9g (63.6% DV)

(1/2 cup Barley, pearled = 3g)

1/2 cup Wheat bran = 12.4g (49.6% DV)

1/2 cup Oats = 8.3g (33.2% DV)

1/2 cup Sorghum = 6.4g (25.6% DV)

3/4 cup Bran Flakes = 5.3g (21.2% DV)

1/2 cup Amaranth, cooked = 5.2g (20.8% DV)

1/2 cup Oatmeal, cooked = 4.1g (16.4% DV)

 

All other whole grains: 1.1-3.8g (4.4-15.2% DV)

 

Beans & Legumes

1/2 cup Beans = 5.6 – 9.6g  (22.4- 38.4% DV)

1/2 cup Split peas = 8.1g (32.4% DV)

1/2 cup Lentils = 7.8g (31.2% DV)

1/2 cup Chickpeas = 6.2g (24.8% DV)

1/2 cup Soybeans = 5.2g (20.8% DV)

 

Nuts & Seeds

1 level tbsp Chia seeds (15g) = 5.2g (20.8% DV)

1 piece Coconut (45g) = 4g (16% DV)

1 level tbsp Flaxseeds (10.3g) = 3.3g (13.2% DV)

 

All other seeds: 0.9-1.3g (3.6-5.2% DV)

Nuts: 0.4-1.5g (1.6-6% DV)

 

Top 14 Foods Highest in Fiber

The foods that are highest in dietary fiber (and provides more than 20% DV) are:

1. Barley, hulled

1/2 cup: 15.9g (63.6% DV)

2. Asian Pear

1 medium: 9.9g (39.6% DV)

3. Oats

1/2 cup: 8.3g (33.2% DV)

4. Beans

1/2 cup: 5.6 – 9.6g (22.4- 38.4% DV)

5. Split peas

1/2 cup: 8.1g (32.4% DV)

6. Lentils

1/2 cup: 7.8g (31.2% DV)

7. Raspberries

1 cup = 8g (32% DV)

8. Blackberries

1 cup = 7.6g (30.4% DV)

9. Artichoke Hearts

1/2 cup: 7.2g (28.8% DV)

10. Sorghum

1/2 cup = 6.4g (25.6% DV)

11. Chickpeas

1/2 cup: 6.2g (24.8% DV)

12. Chia seeds

1 tbsp: 5.2g (20.8% DV)

13. Soybeans

1/2 cup: 5.2g (20.8% DV)

14. Avocado

1/2 medium = 4.6g (18.4%)

 

Tips to Increase Fiber Intake:

  • Having breakfast is important to reach your recommended fiber intake – oatmeal is a great choice
  • Look for cereals with at least 5 grams of fiber per serving. Choose wheat biscuits or flakes topped with fruit
  • Get at least 3 servings of vegetables and 2 servings of fruit per day
  • Snack on fruit, dried fruit, nuts, carrots, popcorn or wholegrain crackers
  • Add nuts & seeds to oatmeal, salads or smoothies
  • Eat fruit & vegetables with the skin on
  • Choose breads with 100% whole grain as first ingredient with at least 6g of fiber per 100g
  • Choose brown rice over white rice
  • Add canned, rinsed chickpeas or lentils (or any other beans) to salads, soups, or dishes
  • Add vegetables to all meals
  • Avoid packaged bars or cereals that claim to be high in fiber

What is Dietary Fiber (or Fibre) What Does it Do & why do we need it - List of Foods Highest in Fiber Article - Tips to Increase Intake

Fiber - Tip - Choose foods with at least 6 grams of fiber per 100g

Drink lots of water

A high fiber diet may not prevent or cure constipation unless you drink enough water everyday. This is also true if taking supplements, drink lots of water to avoid constipation

The added bulk to the diet soaks up water like a sponge, and will lead to toxin build-up in your system if not enough water is consumed. Drink at least 6-8 cups of caffeine free liquid daily

Fiber - Tip - Drink plenty of water to avoid constipation

Avoid a Sudden Increase in Dietary Fiber

A sudden switch to a high fiber diet can create some abdominal discomfort, bloating & flatulence (gas). This occurs because the probiotic bacteria levels in your gut are changing. Introduce fiber foods gradually to avoid discomfort or try an Enzyme Supplement to help with the gas

 

Avoid a Diet Too High in Fiber

A very high fiber diet (more than 40 g per day) can decrease absorption of minerals such as iron, zinc and calcium. Fiber binds to these minerals, forming insoluble salts and excreting them out of the body. Aim for around 25-30 g per day, and don’t overload on fibrous foods. You can easily increase your fiber intake without increasing calories with simple food substitutions

 

Supplements May be an Option

People with gastrointestinal problems or certain diseases may choose to take supplements, including prebiotic soluble products containing inulin. Diabetics may also choose to take these supplements to help with glycemic management & regularity

Buy ‘Inulin Prebiotic Powder’ on Ebay

Food Ingredients that are Sources of Fiber
  • Beta glucan
  • Cellulose
  • Chicory root fiber
  • Cottonseed fiber
  • Edible bean powder
  • Inulin
  • Modified resistant starch
  • Oligofructose
  • Pea fiber
  • Pectin
  • Polydextrose
  • Psyllium
  • Resistant starch
  • Resistant dextrin
  • Resistant maltodextrin
  • Rice bran
  • Short chain fructooligosaccharides
  • Soluble corn fiber
  • Soy fiber
  • Wheat bran
  • Xanthan gum

 

Infographic Summarizing Fiber

What is Dietary Fiber (or Fibre) - What does it do & why do we need it - List of Foods Highest in Fiber - Infographic

Did you Know - Glucomannan is the most viscous dietary fiber

 

Videos to Watch

Buy ‘Glucomannan 100% Pure Powder’ on Ebay

 

 

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What is Dietary Fiber (or Fibre) - What does it do & why do we need it - List of Foods Highest in Fiber

Summary

Fiber not only promotes a healthy gut, but also helps reduce the risk of many chronic diseases & health related problems. A diet high in fiber lowers your cholesterol and reduces your risk of heart disease, constipation, hemorroids, diverticulosis, colon cancer, high blood sugar, diabetes and obesity

Fiber is important for maintaining normal functioning in your colon and should be a part of a healthy diet. It has an additional benefit of promoting the feeling of fullness which can help with weight control

By including more fibrous foods in your diet and eating less refined carbohydrates, you also benefit from the many accompanying vitamins, minerals & phytochemicals

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